Norfolk Health & Fitness

kettlebells

Kettlebell History and FAQs

Kettlebell History FAQs

#1 Who invented the kettlebell?

It’s a grey area. Russia, Persia, China, Greece, and many other countries have invented exercise tools that resemble the modern kettlebell in one way or another!

Russia’s Girya does seem to be the closest to the modern kettlebell, however.

#2 What are kettlebells good for?

Kettlebells are good for the strength and conditioning of the body, as they are good for cardio as well as bodybuilding. This is exactly what they’ve been used for throughout kettlebell history!

#3 What is a good starting weight for kettlebells?

It is recommended that trainers start with 8-16kg bells whilst getting used to the techniques, and before working their way up in Girevoy sport. Kettlebell athletes can compete with much heavier bells than this.

Average female: 12 kg

Strong female: 16 kg

Average male: 16kg

Strong male: 20kg

#4 Are kettlebells good for losing weight?

Used alongside a nutritious diet, kettlebells are good for losing weight! This is because they are a full body workout and help you to build muscle (which burns fat).

#5 When were women allowed in kettlebell sport?

Women first competed in 1999, but they were limited to what they could compete in/what weights they could compete with.

#6 Are kettlebell swings good for you?

Yes, Russian kettlebell swings are a great move to start with; they work your back, shoulders, hips, legs, and glutes. When you master this, move onto the American kettlebell swing.

We are running a one day Level 2 Award in Instructing Kettlebells course in Norwich on the 20th of February

Great for trainers looking to run kettlebell classes or looking to incorporate kettlebell exercises into their one to one sessions.

Entry requirement: Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing

9am-4pm

Course fee: £150

Contact Kevin for further information on:

Email: info@norfolkhealthandfitness.com

Tel: 07969494485

 

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